Buddhist Compassion Relief Tzu Chi Foundation

Wednesday
Aug 21st
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Blessing Ourselves

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If we know how to bless ourselves, good fortune will come to us. On the contrary, when we say bad words, it is tantamount to cursing ourselves.

A commissioner who was soliciting donation encountered someone who said, “How will I have the money to help others, when I am in need of help myself? ” Being reluctant to give, as well as, cursing oneself are undesirable verbal wishes. In fact, if one gives happily from the bottom of one’s heart, or praises when things are praiseworthy, these are all meritorious acts.

This case that the commissioner mentioned reminded me of a similar case in Keelung that happened nearly thirty years ago. At that time, Tzu Chi’s charity mission had propagated to Keelung, and there were cases locally that we are providing relief. Tzu Chi members felt that the money they had donated had indeed been used to help others, and so they approached others for donations.

A middle-aged man, seeing everybody donating NT$10, NT$20 every month, was curious and asked, “Why does someone come and collect money from you every month? Can you really receive back your investment?”

The member replied, “This money is not for investment, but rather for saving people. Do you want to participate?”

The man replied rudely, “What? Donate every month? Others only donate once, they are not like you! If just by donating this little amount of money you can save people, then come and save me first. I need help.”

After hearing what he said, the Tzu Chi member, who happens to be the man’s relative, asked disapprovingly, “Do you really need someone to help you?”

The man answered, “Yes! I’m miserable and poor, I need you to help me!” The member replied, “If you really need help one day, I’ll come and help you!”

A year passed, unfortunately this man’s son met with a car accident. His wife fell sick and he suffered a stroke. After this chain of ill-fated events, it turned out that Tzu Chi was really helping him, just as what the man “wished” for.

Once when I was in Taipei, a member reported this case to me. I said, “Next time, we should not let the other party have the opportunity to say such unkind words. If donating does not give them joy, then we should not be asking further. I hope people do not create bad karma because of this. So, let’s not insist, but leave it to fate.”

 

" To willingly undergo hardship for the sake of helping others is compassion. "
Jing-Si Aphorism