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Home Our Volunteers Stories Simplicity as A Lifestyle - Jing Gui Xie

Simplicity as A Lifestyle - Jing Gui Xie

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When I was young I had the ambition to be a "good person". I used to admire Dr. Albert Schweitzer and Mother Teresa for their selflessness in serving others. I think to myself: They are both human beings, so am I. If they can do it, so can I.

At 30, my annual earning was already a few million NT dollars. At times after all the happy hours and late nights, I used to ask myself, "Is that what you really want?"

At 36, I left my little suite located at Yang Ming Hill and a million dollar job to join Tzu Chi Foundation. Since then I have been to different corners of the world and witnessed all sorts of pain and suffering. With these I learn to acknowledge and treasure my blessings.

Lately the global weather has turned topsy-turvy with droughts, earthquakes and typhoons occurring more frequently and more violently. The Earth can no longer withstand the destruction caused by mankind. If we don't change our habits in order to resolve issues on carbon emission and global warming, a time will come when the problems confronting mankind will not be too big to handle.

A few months ago, I went to Myanmar for international disaster relief work. The lifestyle of the locals that I witnessed is giving us some hope for the future. They were spiritually rich, hardworking and humble. Hopefully more people will take a serious view on global warming and start with oneself in leading a simple and frugal lifestyle.


Xie, Jing Gui

  • Manager, Religious Department of Tzu Chi Foundation
  • Former Deputy Manager of Citibank
  • Former Manager of Royal Bank of Canada and Financial Advisor of Merrill Lynch



Source: The World of Tzu Chi March 2009

 

" Learn to remain undisturbed in the tumult of people and events. Remain at peace within even when busy and occupied. "
Jing-Si Aphorism